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Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Disability Case Manager Updates (Nov 2013)

So, I wrote this back in November 2013, but apparently didn't get it posted... and, have been away from the blogging world since then. I'm hoping to be moved to update soon, but I thought I'd at least get this one out there.

One thing that I really dislike is talking to disability case managers. Thankfully, I've been blessed with some really good ones, over the years. But, they're still asking questions that can really upset my anxiety and depression levels. And, knowing that they're just doing their jobs doesn't necessarily make it easier for me.

I talked to my disability case manager today. She was following up on how things have been going and any treatment changes. I had my second round of Botox a week ago, and have an appointment set up with my doctor mid-January. I told her that it's too soon to know whether or not the Botox will provide relief.

All of that is normal and expected... but, she also asks me every time we talk if my doctor and I have discussed what's next:
  • what treatment to try next, if this one doesn't work
     or, in the case of today,
  • what the plan is for returning to work, if the treatment provides any relief. 
I hate both of these!

The first one makes the assumption that the treatment isn't going to provide any relief. What a quick way to deflate your entire being. Even if you don't really expect a treatment to help, there's normally at least a small amount of hope deep down. Then, you have this external voice asking you to think ahead, as though you have everything already figured out, to when it doesn't work.

The second one makes the assumption that the treatment is going to provide relief. While that's not negative in and of itself, it assumes that the treatment will provide enough relief to allow you to actually return to work. Of course I'm hoping for relief! But, even if Botox is successful, that doesn't mean that I'm suddenly going to be able to return to work.

I responded to her in the best, most honest way I could. I told her that it depends what degree of relief Botox were to provide. And, if it does provide relief, my doctor probably wouldn't immediately have me return to work, since I have a history of treatments providing some relief for a few months and then stop working / helping.

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